Class Notes July/August 2013

Greetings from the very balmy bank of the Connecticut River! So, Memorial Day was 47 degrees and today — four days later — it is 92 degrees. Talk about your hot flash! But I’ll take the warm weather over the cold any day.

So, to continue the dive into the inbox archeological dig, a note from Joe Little about how he met up with Dick Marsh (’75) and Sakhr Tariki in New York at the Blue Note in late 2011.

From Ed Collins, a note on his retirement from corporate life and that he is now running a small consultancy in Houston regarding corporate governance and risk assessment. His spouse, Christi, is a wine merchant for one of the biggest wine and liquor businesses in the U.S. “If you’ve not seen a 100,000 sq ft wine store, come on down and we’ll show you one with a special tour!” I guess this falls into the “everything is bigger in Texas” camp.

From Alvin Faierman, a note recounting his trip to Bhutan where he “survived the hike up to the Tiger’s Nest monastery….continuing to enjoy the practice of pediatric anesthesiology at Rady Children’s Hospital San Diego…with my daughter in medical school and my son as a freshman at Yale [Note: he’d be a rising senior now], I’ll be working for many more years to come.” From Phyllis Orrick: “Say hello to all the TDers. Page — didn’t know you were in Berkeley.”

Interestingly, I received a note from Steve Shapiro asking if he could insert the following addressed to his ’74 freshman counselees in Welch Hall: “Here is a bulletin for the Lost Boys of Welch Hall from their old freshman counselor, Thaddeus Haagar. Now in old age, I feel a surge of regret for the obfuscations, distortions, and bum advice I dispensed in your youth. And this is quite aside from the disinformation spawned by my co-counselor, now a man of the cloth, Father Michael Johnston. To make amends, I want to draw your attention to my new volume, Psychic Readings With The Thinkers Of Heaven, published under the pseudonym of McGinnis on Amazon. Read it on your kindle or personal computer, absorb these golden lessons, and then send me news of yourselves—your whereabouts, your activities, and the name of your parole officer. I will try to share this with the rest. You can reach me through my defamation lawyer at sshapiro@mayerbrown.com. My new volume, like Mad Magazine, is cheap, less than the cost of a Dunkin Donut or a glass of Ripple or Wild Irish Rose.”

From Lowell Keppel: “B. and I continue to chug through our middle years, quickly closing in on what we used to call “Old Age” but which to us now seems more like “Late-Middle-Age”. We have experienced the joys of our first grandchild this year, from our son who is a physicist living with his family in Germany. We consequently have traveled several times to visit them in Hannover. We are now true believers that grandparenting DOES live up to its expectations – and then some! Our other children are in the final years of a Pharm.D. program in Chicago (son), and in the second year of a Engineering and Applied Math doctoral program in San Diego. More travel, tennis, and dining/wining with friends fill the time we are not at our jobs. I admit, it is tough calling the 20-foot commute from our kitchen to my home office a true “job,” although there is no doubt that it is helpful in continuing to fund the aforementioned travel, tennis, and dining/wining.”

From Jack Weber: “Several from Ezra Stiles met for a mini-reunion in South Bend, IN to watch Notre Dame squeek by Pitt in 3 OTs. The generous hosts were John Healey and Paula Olsiewski (’75). Joining in the fun were Neil Krugman and Lee Pratt, Steven Welcome and Greg Brewer, along with my wife Mary and yours truly. Mark Zilbermann and his wife Peggy were unable to attend due to a death in the family, but I did get to see both of them later in the week in Dallas. It was great catching up with everyone and reliving some old stories from our “bright college years” in New Haven.”

And, from Chris Padesky: “I enjoy travelling around the world teaching cognitive behavior therapy. In the last year I taught in Australia, Japan, Hong Kong, England, Sweden, and Switzerland. In 2013 I’ll be teaching in Istanbul, London, Copenhagen, and many other cities in UK, Canada, and US. Incredibly, my book Mind Over Mood will surpass the one million worldwide sales mark in 2013. I enjoy seeing Lucy Daggett (’74) annually and regularly see Jennifer (Pitts ’74) Clarke when in Vancouver. I hope other friends will let me know if you live in a part of the world I am visiting (travel schedule at padesky.com).”

And, of more recent vintage, Ben Fitt writes: “I am delighted to report that my son Joshua has earned a slot in Yale’s Class of 2017. His grandfather (Y44) would have been proud; his uncle (Y79) and step-uncle (Y88) are pleased. Josh will graduate in June from Williamsville North High School near Buffalo, NY. Perhaps he can be one of the undergraduate Reunion clerks at our 40th.”

And to end on an up note, from our class muse, Charlie Finch on Yale’s National Championship in hockey: “Superfan Davidson watched Yale crush Quinnipiac (whose only distinction now is that it graduated Wes Bray’s beautiful niece) for the NCAA men’s hockey crown in the comfy Norfolk CT manse of Ann Havemeyer ’75 and Tom Strumolo. Tres: “I had 2 Dubonnets, a Campari and a cigar, Charlie, and then adjourned to the local saloon to start a celebration, but no one was interested.” Your scribe: “Just because a saloon is in Connecticut, Tres, doesn’t mean that its patrons care about Yale.” Tres: “No. Charlie, everybody in Connecticut loves Yale. They probably just didn’t like hockey.” Me (to myself): (Good Night, Gracie!) Tres (oblivious, natch): “I chatted up a lovely mother/daughter combo at the bar. The mother was quite fetching and definitely interested.” Your scribe: “Did you try to pick her up?” Tres: “I got home and then realized I hadn’t tried. I have forgotten how to.”

Okay, that has caught me up. Again, apologies to all whose written epistles languished in my “file” and please don’t let this lapse deter you from future submissions!


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